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Multiculturalism Bites: Track 9

Featuring: Audio Audio

Multiculturalism is one of the most vexing political issues of our day. How can people with very different values and customs live alongside each other? What is the history of multiculturalism? What are the arguments for and against its various forms? Has it failed? Does it have a future? The Open University's Nigel Warburton interviews ten leading thinkers about the meaning and implications of multiculturalism. David Edmonds introduces each episode.

By: The iTunes U team (Programme and web teams)

  • Duration 3 hours
  • Updated Friday 8th July 2011
  • Introductory level
  • Posted under History & The Arts
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Track 9: Susan Mendus on Toleration

The concept of toleration has a long history; Sue Mendus shows how present day debate is informed by 17th Century discussions.


© The Open University 2011


Tracks in this podcast:

Track   Title Description
1 Tariq Modood on The History of Multiculturalism    In this interview Tariq Modood traces the history of the idea from US civil rights movements in the 1950s and 60s via Canada to present day Europe. Play now Tariq Modood on The History of Multiculturalism
2 Chandran Kukathas on Varieties of Multiculturalism    Chandran Kukathas analyses the varieties of multiculturalism and the implications of a rigorous liberalism. Play now Chandran Kukathas on Varieties of Multiculturalism
3 Martha Nussbaum on Disgust    Martha Nussbaum argues that disgust plays to large a role in many people's assessment of those from whom they differ. Play now Martha Nussbaum on Disgust
4 Clare Chambers on Justifying Intervention    Can a liberal ever intervene in another person's way of living? Clare Chambers argues that in some circumstances intervention is appropriate. Play now Clare Chambers on Justifying Intervention
5 Anne Phillips on Multiculturalism and Liberalism    Anne Phillips explores some of the challenges that multiculturalism provides for liberals and in the process questions some assumptions about the nature of culture. Play now Anne Phillips on Multiculturalism and Liberalism
6 David Miller on the Welfare State and Multiculturalism    David Miller explains how these two institutions can be perceived as incompatible. Play now David Miller on the Welfare State and Multiculturalism
7 Alan Haworth on Free Speech and Multiculturalism    Alan Howarth explores questions of offence and the value of being able to express dissenting or potentially offensive views. Play now Alan Haworth on Free Speech and Multiculturalism
8 John Horton on Political Obligation and Multiculturalism    Should members of a minority be obliged to respect the laws imposed by a majority? John Horton discusses this difficult question. Play now John Horton on Political Obligation and Multiculturalism
9 Susan Mendus on Toleration    The concept of toleration has a long history; Sue Mendus shows how present day debate is informed by 17th Century discussions. Play now Susan Mendus on Toleration
10 Nancy Fraser on Recognition and Multiculturalism    Recognition and respect are key ideas when it comes to achieving political equality. They are, Nancy Fraser argues, central to the debates surrounding multiculturalism. Play now Nancy Fraser on Recognition and Multiculturalism

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