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Saving Setrus: To Intervene or not to Intervene

Updated Friday 7th April 2017

A neighbouring state is falling into war. You're the Prime Minister - can you use your political capital to legally intervene? Should you even try?

The situation in Laurania is deteriorating quickly…

As Prime Minister of Hanmark you have watched with grave concern as neighbouring Laurania has descended from modern democracy into a vicious military dictatorship. Your shared history as nations means that there are many Hannish living and working in Laurania and the eyes of the international community are on you to see how you will react.

Saving Setrus launch image Copyrighted image Icon Copyright: The Open University

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