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The Four Generations of Computers: Track 1

Featuring: Video Video

Computers play a huge part in almost all of our lives, but how did these machines become so powerful and important? And what were some of the earliest models like? This collection of videos takes us through the Four Generations of computers, starting with Colossus, the world's first electronic computer (launched in 1944), and finishing with the BBC Micro (launched in 1981) and Fourth Generation Computers, looking at how technology changed throughout these years. Visiting locations such as The National Museum of Computing in Milton Keynes and The Centre for Computing History in Haverhill, we see an array of fascinating machines and learn about them along the way. This material forms part of The Open University course TU100 My digital life.

By: The iTunes U team (Programme and web teams)

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Track 1: Colossus: The World's First Electronic Computer

A look at the Colossus computer at The National Museum of Computing at Bletchley Park.


© The Open University 2012


Tracks in this podcast:

Track   Title Description
1 Colossus: The World's First Electronic Computer    A look at the Colossus computer at The National Museum of Computing at Bletchley Park. Play now Colossus: The World's First Electronic Computer
2 Elliott 803: Second Generation Computers    Kevin Murall, curator at The National Museum of Computing, tells us all about the Elliott 803. Play now Elliott 803: Second Generation Computers
3 Integrated Circuits: Third Generation Technology    A look at how Integrated Circuit Technology helped computers to evolve. Play now Integrated Circuits: Third Generation Technology
4 BBC Micro: Fourth Generation Computers    Chris Turner, an ex-chief engineer at Acorn, explains how this machine would have been designed and produced and what is meant by single board computer. Play now BBC Micro: Fourth Generation Computers

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