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Science, Maths & Technology
  • Activity
  • 10 mins
  • Level 1: Introductory

Perplex: Classic puzzles, past and present

Updated Thursday 31st August 2017

Test your puzzle-solving ability with incredibly immersive and interactive puzzles from The Open University and UKMT

Ready to be perplexed? Try 8 different puzzles and a whole host of daily challenges from The Open University and UKMT, the United Kingdom Mathematics Trust. 

There's plenty to keep you perplexed:

  • 8 main puzzles
  • Over 40 daily challenges
  • No time limits
  • Stunning graphics
  • Friend leaderboards (mobile app version)
Perplex logo Creative commons image Icon The Open University under Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 4.0 license

Tap to start playing Perplex

Coming soon: Play Perplex on your iOS or Android device! In the meantime, tap the image above to play it in your browser.

Have you got what it takes to earn all 3 stars for each of our main puzzles?

  • Robot Repair: Help the robots to unscramble the computer network
  • Art: Paint the picture making sure no adjacent shapes are the same colour
  • Bubble Blend: Blend all the bubbles to reach the number 100
  • Narrow Bridge: Help four people cross the narrow bridge as fast as possible
  • Wonderland: Take a trip down the rabbit hole to visit the characters of Wonderland
  • Raft Crossing: A family need to cross the river using only a rickety raft
  • Camp Site: The summer season is here and it's time to organise the camp site
  • Knight's Tour: Save the kingdom from the dragon - one square at a time
 

For further information, take a look at our frequently asked questions which may give you the support you need.

Have a question?

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