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Inequality: Have your say

Updated Monday 7th January 2019

Does the pursuit of growth increase inequality? How much inequality is too much inequality? Take an interactive tour through the different positions on these matters in our fictional country Economica, and have your say!

Welcome to Economica, a (fictional) coastal country with stunning beaches, vibrant cities and 22 million inhabitants. It has been a difficult year for much of the population and all eyes are on the Prime Minister to determine the economic future of the country. 

She has stated her views: “I understand that inequality may feel unjust to some, but the fact remains that inequality is good for promoting competition, innovation and ultimately growth. We can’t ignore the benefits that inequality has brought to our country.”

Do you agree that inequality is good for growth? Take an interactive tour through the arguments for and against this approach and have your say!

Start the quiz now

Welcome to Economica, a coastal country with stunning beaches, vibrant cities and 22 million inhabitants. Creative commons image Icon The Open University under Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 4.0 license Select the image above to begin

 

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