Exploring learning disabilities: supporting belonging
Exploring learning disabilities: supporting belonging

Start this free course now. Just create an account and sign in. Enrol and complete the course for a free statement of participation or digital badge if available.

Free course

Exploring learning disabilities: supporting belonging

Session 8: Making belonging happen: rights and advocacy

Introduction

Download this video clip.Video player: Video 1
Skip transcript: Video 1

Transcript: Video 1

CIAN
People say, oh, yes, yes, you have the same rights as everyone else, but I kind of feel like, come on, do we really?
SHAUN
I'm someone that speaks up for my own rights by myself.
CIAN
A lot of people in society treat learning-disabled people as if they're second or third-class citizens.
PHIL
There was no question of a school place. And this is one of the first battles that we had to fight.
End transcript: Video 1
Video 1
Interactive feature not available in single page view (see it in standard view).

The closure of the last of the institutions in the UK in 2009 was supposed to herald a new era for people with learning disabilities. The vision was that people would live ordinary lives – in the community – along with everyone else.

In Session 2 you learned about how the large institutions were finally closed. You heard Mabel Cooper saying that people should never have to go back into such places. And you learned how disabled activists were talking about the social model of disability, which led to a much greater focus on disabled people’s rights.

But people with learning disabilities, their families and those who support them, are not always aware of their rights. Public sector bodies, services, organisations and companies might not take people’s rights seriously. In the worst cases, people’s rights are ignored or even violated. One of the key challenges is making sure there is a workforce that can support people’s rights and enable them to feel like they belong.

In this session you will explore:

  • why it has proved so hard for people with learning disabilities to have their rights upheld
  • the role of self-advocacy and family advocacy in helping people to understand their rights and get their voices heard
  • the role of the workforce in helping people to uphold their rights.
LD_1

Take your learning further371

Making the decision to study can be a big step, which is why you'll want a trusted University. The Open University has 50 years’ experience delivering flexible learning and 170,000 students are studying with us right now. Take a look at all Open University courses372.

If you are new to university level study, we offer two introductory routes to our qualifications. Find out Where to take your learning next?373 You could either choose to start with an Access courses374or an open box module, which allows you to count your previous learning towards an Open University qualification.

Not ready for University study then browse over 1000 free courses on OpenLearn375 and sign up to our newsletter376 to hear about new free courses as they are released.

Every year, thousands of students decide to study with The Open University. With over 120 qualifications, we’ve got the right course for you.

Request an Open University prospectus371