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Influenza: A case study
Influenza: A case study

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Acknowledgements

This course was written by Jon Golding and Hilary MacQueen.

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see terms and conditions [Tip: hold Ctrl and click a link to open it in a new tab. (Hide tip)] ), this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence.

Course image: thierry ehrmann in Flickr made available under Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Licence.

The material acknowledged below is Proprietary and used under licence (not subject to Creative Commons Licence). Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources for permission to reproduce material in this course:

Figure 1: Prescott, L., Harley, J., and Klein, D. (1999) Microbiology, 4th ed. Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies

Figure 3: Noymer, A., and Garenne, M. (2000) ‘The 1918 influenza epidemic’s effects on sex differentials in mortality in the United States’, Population and Development Review, Vol 26 (3) 2000, The Population Council

Figure 6: CNRI/Science Photo Library;

Figure 7: Bammer, T. L. et al. (April 28, 2000) ‘Influenza virus isolates’ reported from WHO, Surveillance for Influenza United States, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Video 1: Immunology Interactive (Male, Brostoff and Roitt) copyright the authors, reproduced by permission of David Male

Video 2: with kind permission from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

Every effort has been made to contact copyright owners. If any have been inadvertently overlooked, the publishers will be pleased to make the necessary arrangements at the first opportunity.

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