Animals at the extremes: The desert environment
Animals at the extremes: The desert environment

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Animals at the extremes: The desert environment

Acknowledgements

The content acknowledged below is Proprietary (see terms and conditions [Tip: hold Ctrl and click a link to open it in a new tab. (Hide tip)] ) and is used under licence.

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources for permission to reproduce material in this course:

Course image: Joshua Tree National Park in Flickr made available under Creative Commons Public Domain 1.0 Licence.

Table 6 Williams et al. (2001) 'Seasonal variation in energy expenditure …’ Journal of Experimental Biology, 204. Copyright © Company of Biologists Ltd;

Table 8 Mueller, P. and Diamond, J. (2001) Metabolic rate and environmental productivity: well-provisioned animals evolved to run and idle fast. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 98 (22). National Academy of Sciences.

Figure 1 Willmer et al. (2000) The occurrence of deserts on a worldwide basis …, Environmental Physiology of Animals, Chapter 14. Blackwell Science Limited;

Figure 2 Marion Hall, The Open University;

Figure 3 Science Photo Library;

Figures 4-7 David Robinson, The Open University;

Figure 8 Willmer, P., Stone, G. and Johnston, I. (2000) Environmental Physiology of Animals. Blackwell Science Limited;

Figure 10 Robinson, M. (1999) Water-holding frog …, A Field Guide to Frogs of Australia, p. 76. New Holland Publishers;

Figure 11 Robinson, M. (1999) Family Myobatrachidae, A Field Guide to Frogs of Australia. New Holland Publishers;

Figure 13 & 15 Dr Peter Davies;

Figure 14 Wardene Weisser/Ardea;

Figure 16 Brad Alexander;

Figure 17 Louw, G.N. (1993) Temperature and thermoregulation, Physiological Animal Ecology, Longman Group UK Ltd;

Figure 18 NHPA/Rod Planck;

Figure 19 Bulova, S.J. (2002) How temperature, humidity …, Journal of Thermal Biology, 27. Elsevier Science;

Figure 20 Dr Lloyd Glenn Ingles, California Academy of Sciences;

Figure 21 Courtesy of Texas Parks & Wildlife Dept Copyright © 2003 Glen Mills;

Figure 22 Based on Folk, G.E. (1974) Textbook of Environmental Physiology (2nd edn), Lea and Febiger;

Figure 23 Kenneth W. Fink/Ardea London Ltd;

Figure 24 Dr Joseph B. Williams;

Figure 25 Williams, J.B. (2002) Energy expenditure and water flux …, Functional Ecology, 15 British Ecological Society;

Figure 31 Withers, P.C. (1992) Comparative Animal Physiology. Saunders College Publishing, Fort Worth;

Figures 32 & 33 Taylor, C. (1977) Exercise and environmental heat loads. International Review of Physiology: Environmental Physiology II, 15. University Park Press;

Figure 34 Irene Tieleman;

Figure 36 Redrawn from Gordon, M.S. (1977) Animal Physiology: Principles and adaptations (3rd edn). Macmillan Publishing, New York;

Figure 42 Pockley, G. (2001) Heat shock proteins in health and disease …, Expert Reviews in Molecular Medicine. Cambridge University Press;

Figures 43 & 44 Zatsepina et al. (2000) Thermotolerant desert lizards …, Journal of Experimental Biology, 203. Copyright © Company of Biologists Ltd;

Figure 45 Mueller, P. and Diamond, J. (2001) Metabolic rate and environmental productivity: well provisioned animals evolved to run and isle fast. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. 98 (22) National Academy of Sciences;

Figures 46 & 47 Tieleman, I. et al. adaptation of metabolism and evaporative water loss …, Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, 270. The Royal Society;

Figure 48 Willmer, P. Stone, G. and Johnston, I (2000) Environmental Physiology of Animals. Blackwell Science Limited;

Figure 49 Williams, J.B. et al. (2001) Seasonal variation in energy expenditure, water flux and flood consumption of Arabian oryx, Oryx Leucoryx, Journal of Experimental Biology, 204. Copyright © Company of Biologists Ltd.

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